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Serious The Arts

Discussion in 'Hobbies' started by Floyd, Apr 19, 2019.

Moderators: gabs, Reagent, Vlad
  1. Floyd

    Floyd i <3 u playermeta True Pillpunk

    Let's have a semi-serious discussion on art. Be it from any region, group, culture, period, or movement. Do you prefer one art-style over another? Do you have a subjective opinion on a specific movement or period of art e.g. "contemporary art isn't art"? Do you even care about the arts, if not - why? By extension, this includes architectural design, and some aspects of theater or fashion.

    I am a fan of Baroque and late Rococo. The ornamentality of Baroque, in presentation or composition, always achieving a grandeur sense of achievement and beauty appeals to me. There's something about Baroque and late Rococo that cannot be found in other art mediums, even in Neo-Classicism or Romanticism. Could it be the emphasis on God and the higher order of our existence, going hand-in-hand with Baroque's favorability among the divine kingdoms of France? I am not so sure, but it has appealed to me since childhood - I've always found comfort and purpose in art, rather than reading or some other hobby.

    Here's a particular favorite from Annibale Carracci; the arguable driving force behind Baroque.
    [​IMG]

    I hope this thread takes off; I think it'd be a good serious discussion to have. For those unfamiliar, I can introduce you to some renowned art movements, and maybe you'll recognize a piece or two.
     
    Last edited: Apr 19, 2019
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  2. morgeta

    morgeta Well-Known Member Regular Member

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  3. Floyd

    Floyd i <3 u playermeta True Pillpunk

    You'd enjoy Jan Steen, I'd imagine. He's a Dutch painter, coming into light around the late Renaissance, early Baroque period. Steen is renowned for capturing the livelihood of our day-to-day lives, such as parties or chatting, with intricate details. There isn't a person, rug, or pot left "to be" as background noise; all have some relation and purpose in the painting.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
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  4. zigbomb

    zigbomb Administrator Staff Member Administrator

    [​IMG]
    I enjoy Patrick Nagel's work.
    [​IMG]
     
  5. Floyd

    Floyd i <3 u playermeta True Pillpunk

    Here's some premature Fauvism from Andre Derain. I like these a lot compared to the rest of his work or Fauvism overall.
    [​IMG]
     
  6. zigbomb

    zigbomb Administrator Staff Member Administrator

    Requesting more fine art.
     
  7. Floyd

    Floyd i <3 u playermeta True Pillpunk

    This is Le Moulin de la Galette. Both Pablo Picasso and Pierre-Auguste Renoir depicted the renowned mecca. The aristocratic, somewhat snobbish party-goers are seen thriving in glamour and lust. Le Moulin de la Galette was a Parisian mecca for both aristocrats and artists alike, catering to their bohemian lifestyles, and becoming renowned for having quite the "alluring" nightlife.

    Pablo Picasso
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    Pierre-Auguste Renoir
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  8. oh-range brand soda

    oh-range brand soda Active Member

    Can't say I'm as well-versed in the Arts as you are Floyd, where do you go to find new pieces?
     
  9. Floyd

    Floyd i <3 u playermeta True Pillpunk

    This one is a favorite of mine. It's romantic, bittersweet, and endearing. Given the context, it's quite personal and emotional. It is The Painter by Marc Chagall. Here, you see Marc kissing his newly be-wedded wife, Bella. The two met in their teenage years, becoming a near instant romantic success and remaining in love for decades to come. She became his muse and appeared throughout numerous paintings of his. To his dismay, Bella died in 1944. A heartbroken Marc continued to use his beloved's likeness in his work; forever remaining fond of her; as we all remain fond of our first love; whether they remain with us or long gone.

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  10. Vlone

    Vlone New Member

    I'm not familiar with art to much but the Renaissance and Leonardo's mysteries are quite fascinating and interesting. Not only is the art pretty nice, but how people started to research upon science anatomy etc even if the Catholic church was against it back then...
    [​IMG]

    Someone else I admire is the German philologist Friedrich Nietzsche he is most known for he's philosophical thoughts and books. He was a meaningful person which has contributed a lot into the philosophical community. He thought we have killed god... But not only god he thought we killed that which gives the humans meaning. He was also obsessed with the thought of what would fill the meaning-vacuum if Christianity or God would vanish. Quite interesting stuff...
    [​IMG]
     
  11. i will try to post more in this thread later because i appreciate it`` it is well known 2 some that i appreciate art a lot` particularly i like isaac nesterov and russian artists of this period`

    however nowadays i am very much a lover of brutalist architecture and rick owens ~ who conveys brutalism in the form of fashion` proceeding from rick owens ~ i very much appreciate the classical pioneers of the antifashion movement such as yohji yamamoto ~ i wonder if i could ever wear his clothes with confidence haha`
    and ~ i could not forget the ever bold philipp plein who many ppl hate nowadays` plein is the flexer of flexers``
     
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  12. i forgot to mention that regarding fashion ~ one of my favourite things which we have seen in our lifetime is the margiela tabi boot` i could go on and on about this boot``` what more needs 2 b said? it is counter culture in the form of footwear` otherworldly and eye catching it thankfully never became a mainstream trend which has allowed it to survive indefinitely since margielas very first show` it gets recycled n recycled ~ having seen so many iterations it feels like a whole new shoe with each one`

    there is something so alluring about these boots that not even a several inch high heel will detract me from thirsting for it` i think that ~ really ~ it is a fantastic shoe` and undoubtably it is the pinnacle of everything antifashion has stood for
     
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  13. I will try to post more in this thread later, because I appreciate it. It is well known to some that I appreciate art a lot. In particular, I like Isaac Nesterov and Russian artists of that particular period.

    However, nowadays, I am very much a lover of brutalist [sic] architecture and Rick Owens, who conveys brutalism [sic] in the form of fashion. Proceeding from Rick Owens, I very much appreciate the classical pioneers of the Anti-fashion movement such as Yohji Yamamoto. I wonder if I could ever wear his clothes with confidence, haha.
    I could not forget the ever bold Philipp Plein, who many people hate nowadays, Plein is the flexer [sic] of flexers [sic].
     
  14. I forgot to mention that regarding fashion, one of my favorite things which we have seen in our lifetime is the 'Margiela Tabi Boot', I could go on and on about this boot. What more needs to be said? It is a counter-culture in the form of footwear. It is both otherworldly and eye catching, and it thankfully never became a mainstream trend which has allowed it to survive indefinitely since Margielas very first show. This particular shoe gets recycled and recycled, and I've seen many iterations, so many that it feels like a whole new shoe with each one.

    There is something so alluring about these boots that not even a several-inches-high-heel will detract me from thirsting for it. I think, in all reality, it's a fantastic shoe and un-doubtably [sic] it is the pinnacle of everything anti-fashion has stood for.
     
  15. Floyd

    Floyd i <3 u playermeta True Pillpunk

    A good take on Anti-fashion. I very much agree. A favorable runway and collection of mine would be BABEL by Rick Owens. Personally, I believe it to be his magnum opus - it's Rick Owens at his peak. He neatly packs, presents, and symbolizes abstract themes revolving around societal collapse, modernity, and other philosophical discussions. Using the age old story of the Tower of Babel in combination with Tatlin's Tower was genius, and works especially well. A pivotal point being the wooden structure; let's call it the Tower of Rick - Rick's tower is similar to Tatlin's Tower in shape and structure, but narrative-wise takes on the Tower of Babel. One collapsed, while one never left conception. One served as a stairway to heaven, while one served as a monument to newfound modernity. The Tower of Rick is burnt to the ground, lit on fire by pseudo-religious figures wearing distorted, abstract garments. A possible play on the Tower of Babel's collapse through confusion via God's wrath in the form of differing languages, cultures, and people? Or a play on Tatlin's Tower being structurally impossible to construct, thus never leaving the planning table, and being metaphorically burnt. I'm leaning towards a play on Tatlin's Tower, as while the Tower of Rick is burning, a single pan captures the Eiffel Tower in the background; a profound symbol of modernity. Rick, however, made his thoughts clear on the matter, and emphasized a message of hope in the face of confusion and collapse.




    I'm a fan of Michel Foucault and Yukio Mishima. I may not agree with their political messages, but I view them and their work with profound admiration.
     
    Last edited: May 6, 2019
  16. Floyd

    Floyd i <3 u playermeta True Pillpunk

    Continuing on Yukio Mishima - I found his take on aestheticism, or rather finding the beauty in tragedy, to be very truthful. He spoke of tragedy blooming into something beautiful and how all aestheticism, particularly in the west, is rooted in tragedy in itself.

    He spoke of tragedy blooming into something beautiful, leading to some sort of cataclysm in which you transform yourself, becoming a source and end of life. Aestheticism is key in all of Mishima's work and even in his life. People often confuse Mishima's emphasis on aestheticism and tragedy for something on-par with Nietzschean life-affirming perspective of creating self meaning when the two aren't mutual. You see, aestheticism is why Mishima's death took on such a theatrical, albeit violent form. The concept of an aesthetic was a means of Mishima transforming himself; and for him there was nothing more beautiful than meeting your demise in such a tragic, brutal, yet poetic way at your peak rather than wither away at old age. Through his work, I came to appreciate the beauty in life, in our surroundings, in our personal lives, and how it all interjects or rather relies upon tragedy. I come from a very archaic culture and place in which the aesthetic, artistic past is rejected or simply ignored rather than appreciated, preserved, and propped up - as Mishima would've preferred.

    Read: The Temple of The Golden Pavilion, Confessions of a Mask and Sun and Steel by Yukio Mishima or Mishima, Aesthetic Terrorist: An Intellectual Portrait by Andrew Rankin.

     
  17. ahh i must definitely agree` i was very pleased with the music choices with complete honesty`` i was very surprised that rick used ic3peak and tommy cash ~ both of whom i like very much {tommy cash is little too vulgar i think}` it was a nice break from rick`s brief sickening obsession with christeene tho
     
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